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Doctor Faustus is based on an older tale; it is believed to be the first dramatization of .[citation needed]

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The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus by Christopher …

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As a prologue, the Chorus tells us about the type of play is. It is not about war or courtly love, but rather about Faustus, who was born of lower class parents. This can be seen as a departure from the Medieval tradition; Faustus holds a lower status than kings and saints, but his story is still worth being told. It gives an introduction to his wisdom and abilities, most notably in divinity which he excels so tremendously that he is awarded a doctorate. During this opening, we also get our first clue to the source of Faustus' downfall. Faustus is likened to the story of Icarus, who flew too close to the sun with his waxen wings and as a result fell to his death when the sun melted the wax. This does indeed clue us to Faustus's end as well as bringing our attention to the idea of hubris (excessive pride) which is represented in the Icarus story.

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Is it someone who pulls a drowning child out of a lake or is it someone such as Nelson Mandela who inspires others to be better.
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The theological implications of Doctor Faustus have been the subject of considerable debate throughout the last century. Among the most complicated points of contention is whether the play supports or challenges the doctrine of absolute predestination, which dominated the lectures and writings of many English scholars in the latter half of the sixteenth century. According to Calvin, meant that God, acting of his own free will, elects some people to be saved and others to be damned — thus, the individual has no control over his own ultimate fate. This doctrine was the source of great controversy because it was seen by the so-called anti-Calvinists to limit man's free will in regards to faith and salvation, and to present a dilemma in terms of .

 

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Some scholars believe that Marlowe developed the story from a popular translation, commonly called , of an earlier, unpreserved, German edition of , which itself may have been influenced by even earlier, equally unpreserved pamphlets in Latin, such as those that likely inspired treatment of the damnation of the doctor of Paris, (). Whatever the inspiration, the development of Marlowe's play is very faithful to the of especially in the way it mixes comedy with tragedy.

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As a prologue, the Chorus tells us what type of play Doctor Faustus is. It is not about war and courtly love, but about Faustus, who was born of lower class parents. This can be seen as a departure from the Medieval tradition; Faustus holds a lower status than kings and saints, but his story is still worth telling. It gives an introduction to his wisdom and abilities, most notably in academia which he excels so tremendously that he is awarded a doctorate. During this opening, we also get our first clue to the source of Faustus' downfall. Faustus' tale is likened to that of , who flew too close to the sun and fell to his death when the sun melted his waxen wings. This is indeed a hint to Faustus's end as well as bringing our attention to the idea of (excessive pride) which is represented in the Icarus story.


The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus

Faustus comments that he has reached the end of every subject he has studied. He appreciates as being a tool for arguing; as being unvalued unless it allowed raising the dead and immortality; Law as being upstanding and above him; as useless because he feels that all humans commit sin, and thus to have sins punishable by death complicates the logic of Divinity. He dismisses it as "What doctrine call you this? Que sera, sera (What will be, shall be)".

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The play asks serious questions about humanity's relationship with God. In the first scene, Faustus believes that if we all have sins, sin is inevitable, and it is thus implausible that God would punish us for sin. This helps one to conclude if Faustus, who abandons divinity for the devil, was at fault to begin with. This is because it evokes his false notion that in the story of Adam and Eve, if the Creator -being all knowing as well as omnipotent- knew that Adam would sin in the end, he should have made Adam resilient to it (or rather make him of better stuff). This would lead one to think that if that were so, it would be the Creator's fault as opposed to Adam simply because the Creator gave him the ability to sin. This of course is flawed reasoning because it neglects to point out the Creator's desire for those who will love him by choice, rather than by default. Indeed the play of Doctor Faustus provokes thought on many interesting concepts like these.

The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus by Christopher …

Using Mephistophilis as a messenger, Faustus strikes a : he is to be allotted twenty-four years of life on Earth, during which time he will have Mephistophilis as his personal servant. At the end he will give his soul over to Lucifer as payment and spend the rest of time as one damned to Hell. This deal is to be sealed in Faustus' own blood. After cutting his arm, the wound is divinely healed and the Latin words "Homo, fuge!" (Man, flee!) appear upon it. Despite the dramatic nature of this divine intervention, Faustus disregards the inscription with the assertion that he is already damned by his actions thus far and therefore left with no place to which he could flee. Mephistophilis brings coals to break the wound open again, and thus Faustus is able to take his oath.