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  • Six Child Psychology Tips for Parents

The essential components of Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) include: Focus on the parent-child relationship as the primary target of intervention.

About; Contact; Parent Relationships and Child Outcomes

Parent - Child Relationships and the Psychology by …

Parent-Child Relationships in Early Childhood and Development of Anxiety & Depression
Early Parent - Infant Relationship Quality of Relationships 1) Parent's understanding 2) Child's needs Foundation of developing relationships - Behaviour
- Interractions
- Feelings
- Expectations Attatchment Theory What is an attachment?

Parent–child relationships and offspring’s positive …

The child-parent relationship has a major influence on most aspects of child development
Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an intervention for children (ages 2-12 years) and their parents or caregivers that focuses on decreasing externalized child behavior problems (e.g., defiance, aggression), increasing positive parent behaviors, and improving the quality of the parent-child relationship. It teaches parents traditional play-therapy skills to improve parent-child interactions and problem-solving skills to manage new problem behaviors. Parents are taught and practice communication skills and behavior management with their children in a playroom while coached by therapists. Most parenting programs for abusive parents treat parents separately from their children and use an instructive approach, but PCIT treats parents with their children. Skills are behaviorally defined, directly coached, and practiced in parent-child sessions. Parents are shown directly how to implement specific behavioral skills with their children. Therapists observe parent-child interactions through a one-way mirror and coach the parent using a radio earphone. Live coaching and monitoring of skill acquisition are cornerstones of PCIT.

 

Forensic Psychology - Children Who Resist Parental …


The PCIT intervention is composed of three phases. The first phase consists of orientation sessions focused on increasing parent motivation for active participation. Following the motivational enhancement orientation module, parents begin a course of approximately 12 PCIT sessions that consists of two more phases. In the child-direct interaction phase, parents allow their child to lead the play activity while they describe, imitate, and praise the child’s appropriate behavior and ignore inappropriate behavior. In the parent-directed interaction phase, parents direct children’s activity by using clear, positively stated direct commands and consistent consequences for their children’s behavior (praise or time-outs). The goal is to enhance relationships while improving compliance.


Clements, Melissa A., Arthur Reynolds, and Edmond Hickey, "Site-Level Predictors of Children's School and Social Competence in the Chicago Child-Parent Centers," Vol. 19, No. 2, 2004, pp. 273-296.

Reynolds, Arthur J., discussion paper no. 1126-97, Madison, Wisc.: Institute for Research on Poverty, 1997. As of September 29, 2008:

Reynolds, Arthur J., Lincoln, Neb.: University of Nebraska Press, 2000.

Reynolds, Arthur J., "Effects of a Preschool Plus Follow-On Intervention for Children at Risk," Vol. 30, No. 6, 1994, pp. 787-804.

Reynolds, Arthur J., "One Year of Preschool Intervention or Two: Does it Matter?" Vol. 10, 1995, pp. 1-31.

Reynolds, Arthur J., H. Chang, and Judy A. Temple, Vol. 22, No. 3, 1998, pp. 341-372.

Reynolds, Arthur J., and Judy A. Temple, "Extended Early Childhood Intervention and School Achievement: Age Thirteen Findings from the Chicago Longitudinal Study," Vol. 69, No. 1, 1998, pp. 231-246.

Reynolds, Arthur J., and Judy A. Temple, "Quasi-Experimental Estimates of the Effects of a Preschool Intervention: Psychometric and Econometric Comparisons," Vol. 19, No. 4, 1995, pp. 347-373.

Reynolds, Arthur J., Judy A. Temple, Dylan L. Robertson, and Emily A. Mann, "Age 21 Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Title I Chicago Child-Parent Centers," Vol. 24, No. 4, 2002, pp. 267-303.

Reynolds, Arthur J., Judy A. Temple, Dylan Robertson, and Emily Mann, "Long-Term Effects of an Early Childhood Intervention on Educational Attainment and Juvenile Arrest," Vol. 285, No. 18, 2001, pp. 2339-2346.

Reynolds, Arthur J., Judy A. Temple, Suh-Ruu Ou, et. al., "Effects of a School-Based Early Childhood Intervention on Adult Health and Well-Being: A 19-Year Follow-Up of Low-Income Families," Vol. 161, No. 8, August 2007, pp. 730-739.

Temple, Judy A., Arthur J. Reynolds, and Wendy T. Miedel, "Can Early Intervention Prevent High School Dropout? Evidence from the Chicago Child-Parent Centers," Vol. 35, No. 1, 2000, pp. 31-56.

Thompson, Matthew D., Arthur J. Reynolds, and Judy A. Temple, "Letters—Early Childhood Educational Intervention and Long-term Developmental Outcomes," Vol. 286, No. 15, 2001, pp. 1835-1836.


Forensic psychology understanding of Children Who Resist Parental ..

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an intervention for children (ages 2-12 years) and their parents or caregivers that focuses on decreasing externalized child behavior problems (e.g., defiance, aggression), increasing positive parent behaviors, and improving the quality of the parent-child relationship. It teaches parents traditional play-therapy skills to improve parent-child interactions and problem-solving skills to manage new problem behaviors. Parents are taught and practice communication skills and behavior management with their children in a playroom while coached by therapists. Most parenting programs for abusive parents treat parents separately from their children and use an instructive approach, but PCIT treats parents with their children. Skills are behaviorally defined, directly coached, and practiced in parent-child sessions. Parents are shown directly how to implement specific behavioral skills with their children. Therapists observe parent-child interactions through a one-way mirror and coach the parent using a radio earphone. Live coaching and monitoring of skill acquisition are cornerstones of PCIT.The PCIT intervention is composed of three phases. The first phase consists of orientation sessions focused on increasing parent motivation for active participation. Following the motivational enhancement orientation module, parents begin a course of approximately 12 PCIT sessions that consists of two more phases. In the child-direct interaction phase, parents allow their child to lead the play activity while they describe, imitate, and praise the child’s appropriate behavior and ignore inappropriate behavior. In the parent-directed interaction phase, parents direct children’s activity by using clear, positively stated direct commands and consistent consequences for their children’s behavior (praise or time-outs). The goal is to enhance relationships while improving compliance.Over the years, the intervention has gone through variations, such as emphasizing self-motivation in the orientation, enhancing services outside the programs for parents with mental health and substance abuse problems, developing abbreviated sequences of sessions that reduce attrition, and working with abusive parents.The internet-delivered iteration of the program (I-PCIT) follows the same structure but occurs over Skype or a similar videoconferencing program with the therapist in lieu of the one-way mirror used in the clinic setting.

Parent Child Clinic - Psychology Today

Parents play a substantial role in shaping children’s emotional health, particularly in early childhood.1 To better understand the impact of the parent-child relationship on the development of anxiety and depression in young children, research has focused on three main constructs 1) the degree to which a parent may be overprotective and/or critical, 2) parental modelling of anxiety and 3) the security of the child’s attachment to his or her caregivers.