• North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) | U.S. …
  • North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) ..
  • North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) No

North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) | …

North American free trade agreement (NAFTA) – …

North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) - Investopedia

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is an agreement signed by Canada, Mexico, ..
Yup, Rudy’s at it again, milking the old cash cow, the 9/11 sheriff routine to those sympathetic (rich and wannabe richer)
Texans. The client, Cintra, has signed an agreement with the Texas Department of Transportation to finish the State
Highway 121 toll road by 2011, a quarter century faster than possible through traditional sources (i.e. American workers),
according to the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). What you should also know is that the toll road is part of
the NAFTA Superhighway and construction of the Trans-Texas Corridor (TTC).

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) - …

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) - Chapter 11 - Investment
Many of our national highways will start charging tolls and we will have to pay to travel on our own roads. These additional fees
will be added to the International Highway coffers along with federal, state, and "private"(Chinese?) funding. The manufacturing
of many high line products have left US shores and transplanted themselves in slave labor China. We now import goods from the
Chinese that were originally made in the USA. This accounts for the $60 billion dollar trade deficit with this communist country.
Importing to us is the most important way to fund their military and this NAFTA trade Corridor will increase their access
exponentially.

 

NAFTA (North America Free Trade Agreement) - …


s article : “Evidence shows that NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement involving the U.S., Canada and Mexico, is being expanded without congressional approval or oversight as part of a plan to create an economic and political entity known as the North American Union.” This is “the project that has people in Texas and around the nation up in arms.”


Independent Journalist Cliff Kincaid nails it in his article : “Evidence s
hows that NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement involving the U.S., Canada and Mexico, is being expanded
without congressional approval or oversight as part of a plan to create an economic and political entity known as the North
American Union.” This is “the project that has people in Texas and around the nation up in arms.”


North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) - …

Jerome Corsi, who earned a Ph.D. in political science from Harvard, describes the Superhighway in a June 12, 2006 article in
Human Events Online, a conservative website. According to Dr. Corsi, the mammoth road system is being quietly pushed by the
Bush Administration. The proposed superhighway would be about 400 yards wide and run along U.S. Interstate 35 from the
Mexican border at Loredo, to the Canadian border above Duluth, Minnesota.

According to the Ambassador Bridge website, the Superhighway would facilitate commerce between Mexico, Canada, and the
U.S. pursuant to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which was signed by the leaders of those three nations
in 1994. Ambassador Bridge, owned by the Bridge Company on the U.S. side, and the Canadian Transit Company on the
Canadian side, is the busiest crossing between the U.S. and Canada, according to the website. The owners of Ambassador Bridge
are members of the NAFTA Superhighway Coalition (NASCO).


According to Ambassador Bridge, NAFTA trade among the three countries is expected to reach $ 1.5 trillion by 2010, and 75
percent of trade between the U.S. and Canada, America’s primary trading partner, is by truck. The website says that the
Superhighway is good for the economies of all three nations and will provide jobs in towns near Highway 401, which serves the
Canadian side of the Bridge.

Ambassador Bridge also says that the parties to NAFTA are obliged to build the Superhighway to “safely and efficiently” handle
the increased road traffic projected over the next few years. Traffic safety is fine and dandy, but what about the safety of
American borders?

In his Human Events article, Dr. Corsi writes that the proposed superhighway would allow containers from our good buddy China,
and other parts of the Far East, to enter the U.S. through a Mexican port without assistance from American longshoremen, a
situation which has their union up in arms.

Mexican trucks, without Teamsters Union help, would cross the U.S. border in express lanes scanned only by a new electronic
technology called the SENTRI System. The first customs stop for the trucks would be at a yet-to-be-built Mexican customs office
in Kansas City, whose three-million-dollar cost would be paid for by Kansas City taxpayers, according to Dr. Corsi.

North American Free Trade Agreement - Wikipedia

Second, while some view the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, as a failure that should be repealed, I believe
it was a success for what it was designed to do, but it is no longer enough to cope with the challenges of an enlarged market and
a more competitive international system. NAFTA succeeded in reducing barriers and among the
three countries, making it the largest free-trade area in the world in terms of gross product. It failed because we need to do
more than just reduce trade and investment barriers. It did not address the problem of illegal migration; it ignored the issue
of border security; it failed to reduce the income gap between Mexico and its northern neighbors; it created no institutions
or consultation procedures that would manage the problems in the relationship and improve people's lives in a demonstrable
way. That is why I propose a "North American Community," whose premise is that all three sovereign countries benefit when
each of the countries makes progress, and all suffer when one fails. Trade benefits all three countries, and a more prosperous
Mexico in the long-term means less illegal migration. But "trade" is not enough to address problems that emerge from an
expanding market.