• Hate Crimes
  • By JAMES B
  • JACOBS and KIMBERLY POTTER Oxford University Press

The Intelligence Report is the Southern Poverty Law Center's award-winning magazine

WHY HATE SPEECH SHOULD NOT BE BANNED | …

Perfectionism & Hate Speech Law | Issue 123 | …

Here’s the Core Reason Why People Hate Jews That No One’s Talking About
The root cause of anti-Semitism lies in the strength of Jewish identity. Like any group with a strong focus on in group/out group identity, constant reference to differences invites constant awareness of differences. It is by no means a problem unique to Judaism and therefore can never be resolved as long as it is thought of as a unique or discrete Jewish issue. If Jewish leaders and writers spent more time and effort drawing comparison of their struggles to those of others, and less time focusing on just Jewish persecution, we can isolate the most ignorant and hateful sources of anti-Semitism from the mainstream. Jewish people have just as deep of a history of contribution and collaboration with other cultures as they do of persecution, and focusing on the similarities rather than the differences is the only useful way forward. Easier said than done, but worth the effort, for any group or culture.

How The New ‘US Hate Laws’ Will Change Our Lives | …

‘Do your parents make bombs?’: Muslim students …
The feature on our website contains in-depth profiles of individuals who are key figures on the radical right. Most are associated in some way with either hate groups or antigovernment “Patriot” groups. These profiles, however, should not be confused with the hate group list; we do not list individuals as hate groups, and not all of the profiled individuals are members or leaders of hate groups.

 

In some places around the world, racial hatred is increasing

Kaepernick & Maxwell Hate Proves Our Point, Says …
"Hate crime" is a social construct. It is a new term, which is neither familiar nor self-defining. Coined in the late 1980s to emphasize criminal conduct motivated by prejudice, it focuses on the psyche of the criminal rather than on the criminal's conduct. It attempts to extend the civil rights paradigm into the world of crime and criminal law.


Cell I on our table also includes hate crimes by individuals whose prejudices are emotionally intense, but who are not part of any organized group. Consider Colin Ferguson, the black man who murdered six white commuters and wounded 19 others on the Long Island Railroad in December 1993. After the shooting, police found a note in his pocket explaining that he chose Long Island as the venue because it was predominantly white. In the note Ferguson expressed hatred for Asians, whites, and "Uncle Tom Negroes." Some commentators said Ferguson's murders were not hate crimes because he was mentally ill or because he was prejudiced against "Uncle Tom Negroes" as well as whites and Asians. According to Bob Purvis, legal director of the University of Maryland's Center for the Applied Study of Ethnoviolence, the Ferguson rampage was not a hate crime: "By its nature, a mass murder is a crime born of immense psychiatric disturbance.... Mass murder is mass murder; it's not a hate crime." This argument, in effect, says that bona fide prejudice is irrational but not so irrational as to lead to crimes of grand scale. Such reasoning might lead to the bizarre conclusion that Hitler was not prejudiced and the Holocaust not the ultimate hate crime. In short, we are quite prepared to accept that prejudice often includes extreme irrationality and even mental instability.


Toward an Understanding of Prejudice and Racism - …

Our goal is to identify all U.S.-based groups that meet our definition of a hate group regardless of whether one would think of the group as being on the left or the right. One can always debate whether a group should be considered “left” or “right.” , which we list for its anti-Semitism and vilification of white people, is a case in point. Another example is Jamaat al-Muslimeen – a Muslim group we list because of its vilification of Jews and the LGBT community. But, as a general matter, prejudice on the basis of factors such as race is more prevalent on the far right than it is on the far left.

Frequently asked questions about hate groups | …

We are launching a free evening filmmaking course with the aim of producing a film that tackles the widespread issue of discrimination, bullying and prejudice that many transgender people face in the UK today.

Anti-Defamation League: Fighting Anti-Semitism and Hate

There are many other prejudices toward which American society has become more sensitive in the past several decades. One prominent example is ageism--prejudice and discrimination against the elderly. Senior citizens, through their lobbying organization, the American Association of Retired Persons, have become a powerful political force, and they have achieved considerable success in having age discrimination prohibited. If crime based upon race discrimination is an especially heinous crime, then many people will no doubt conclude that crime based upon ageism ought also to be a hate crime trigger. The same kind of logic no doubt will lead advocates for the physically and mentally handicapped, undocumented aliens, HIV positive persons, and others to demand special condemnation and extra punishment for criminals who victimize them. Thus, the creation of hate crime laws and jurisprudence will inevitably generate a contentious politics about which prejudices count and which do not. Creating a hate crime jurisprudence forces us to proclaim which prejudices are worse than others, itself an exercise in prejudice. This controversy will really have little to do with appropriate sentencing for criminals and everything to do with the comparative symbolic status of various groups.