• Understanding The Crisis In Greece From Boom To Bust
  • UNDERSTANDING THE CRISIS IN GREECE FROM BOOM TO BUST
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In Triassic seas, ammonoids recovered from the brink of extinction at the Permian’s end to live in their golden age while still periodically booming and busting. It took ten million years after the Permian’s end for reefs to begin to recover, and when they did, they were formed by , which evolved from their ghost ancestors. Stony corals also built today’s reefs. Bivalves dominated biomes in which brachiopods once flourished, and have yet to relinquish their dominance. Before the Permian extinction, about two-thirds of marine animals were immobile. That number dropped to half during the Triassic, ecosystems became far more diverse, and a marine “arms race” . Predators invented new shell cracking and piercing strategies, and prey had to adapt or go extinct. The few surviving and were driven to ecosystem margins, and the Jurassic and Cretaceous would see the appearance of shell-cracking and .

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Becoming bipedal allowed for far greater mobility than knuckle-walkers were capable of, and farther excursions from the safety of trees became possible. But ranging farther from the safety of trees was also dangerous. Like , key australopithecine fossil finds were apparently where the remains of predator meals accumulated, usually in caves. Those early apes on the path to humanity were the hunted, not hunters. Cats such as leopards feasted on australopithecines, and one robust skull showed . Most surviving bones were those from body parts more difficult to eat, with less flesh on them, so predators left those parts largely intact. Fossil hunters discovered body parts such as jaws, teeth, hands, and feet. Skull finds are rare.

 

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The end-Permian extinction correlated rather precisely with the eruption of the , which continued for a million years and spewed millions of cubic kilometers of basalt. The end-Permian extinction was the final blow for many ancient organisms. My beloved made their final exit from Earth during the end-Permian extinction, as did tabulate and rugose corals, , and the last freshwater . Articulate brachiopods completely vanished from the fossil record, but reappeared in the Triassic via , but brachiopods never recovered their former abundance and have lived a marginal existence ever since. and disappeared along with the reefs, while complex foraminiferans and also vanished, and all of them staged comebacks in the Triassic via ghost ancestors. Bivalves suffered relatively modestly (“only” about 60% of bivalve genera went extinct) and quickly recovered, fish were barely affected, and gastropods were devastated but quickly recovered. Ammonoids went through their typical boom-and-bust pattern during the Permian extinctions, while nautiloids kept dwindling but scraped by in their deep-water exile. In the final tally, more than 95% of all marine species went extinct. Not only was the death toll tremendous, but the from before that the Permian extinction marks the end of an era, which began with the Cambrian Explosion. The ended with the Permian extinction and the began.


Animals can quickly adapt to changing environmental conditions that impact their food supply. For example, in recent studies of Galapagos finches during a severe drought, small-beaked finches largely died out, because large and hard seeds became dominant. The surviving finch population had measurably larger beaks in one year. It took 15 years of normal conditions for finch beaks to return to their pre-drought length. Wrangham argued that the biological changes attending cooked food would have been immediately evident, and anatomy presented the most dramatic changes seen in the human line. The only other plausible candidate would have been , but it was only a more robust version of .