• The Strange Link Between Junk Food and Depression - …
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  • Junk food blues: Are depression and diet related? - …

27/06/2011 · WebMD discusses common food traps that accompany depression including eating too much, eating too little, and making unhealthy food choices.

9 Types of Food to Help Manage Depression | ActiveBeat

Diet for Depression | Foods that Help Depression

Nutrition approaches for helping you to improve your mood and overcome depression
At the Brain Bio Centre we routinely test individuals with low mood or motivation for food intolerance. It is not at all uncommon for us to find that putting a person on the allergy-free diet they need relieves symptoms of depression, insomnia or anxiety.

Food Therapy for Depression and Anxiety | HuffPost


Some foods are associated with mood problems. For example, in a huge population study, Coeliac Disease (a severe intolerance to gluten – the protein found in wheat, rye and barley) was associated with an 80% increased risk for depression. It is thought that Coeliac Disease is vastly underdiagnosed in the UK. Your GP can test for it, and should test you if you have fluctuating digestive symptoms including diarrhoea, constipation or bloating, and especially if you have unexplained anaemia. In fact, you can have mood symptoms relating to gluten, even without Coeliac Disease.

 

How it's Used for Depression and Anxiety.


The best way to keep your blood sugar level even is to eat what is called a low Glycemic Load (GL) diet and avoid, as much as you can, refined sugar and refined foods, eating instead whole foods, fruits, vegetables, and regular meals. The book, the Holford Low GL Diet Bible, explains exactly how to do this so this is a great resource if you really want to improve your blood sugar balance. Caffeine also has a direct effect on your blood sugar and your mood and is best kept to a minimum, as is alcohol.


Lots of refined sugar and refined carbohydrates (meaning white bread, pasta, rice and most processed foods,) is also linked with depression because these foods not only supply very little in the way of nutrients but they also use up the mood enhancing B vitamins; turning each teaspoon of sugar into energy needs B vitamins. In fact, a study of 3,456 middle-aged civil servants, published in British Journal of Psychiatry found that those who had a diet which contained a lot of processed foods had a 58% increased risk for depression, whereas those whose diet could be described as containing more whole foods had a 26% reduced risk for depression.


Fight Depression: 20 Best Foods for Happiness - …

Serotonin is made in the body and brain from an amino acid called tryptophan. Tryptophan is then converted into another amino acid called 5-Hydroxy Tryptophan (5-HTP), which in turn is converted into the neurotransmitter serotonin. Tryptophan can be found in the diet; it’s in many protein rich foods such as meat, fish, beans and eggs. 5-HTP is found in high levels in the African Griffonia bean, but this bean is not a common feature of most people’s diet. Just not getting enough tryptophan is likely to make you depressed; people fed food deficient in tryptophan became rapidly depressed within hours.

Top 10 Foods That Fight Depression | A Comprehensive …

For Jacka, a break in our love affair with fast food can’t come quickly enough. According to some predictions, – with countries across the world following similar trends. “If we add depression to the burden of illness that results from unhealthy diet,” she says, “no country can afford the cost.”

Research-based recommendations for foods that fight depression

Either way, the result has enthused Jacka about . Unlike Reynold’s study, she is trying to find out whether it can relieve the symptoms in those people already diagnosed with depression. Her subjects will have regular meetings with a dietician, who will advise them on the best ways to improve the nutritional value of their meals. Along the way, Jacka is taking blood tests to see if she can forge a more concrete link between components of the diet, levels of inflammation and oxidative stress, and the volunteers’ ongoing symptoms. If the visits to the dietician have a big enough effect on their recovery rate, she thinks it might then be possible to try out a dietary change as a treatment in its own right.

Changes in your diet to help fight depression

Folic acid is one of seven nutrients – the others being B2, B6, B12, zinc, magnesium and TMG – that help normalise homocysteine. Deficiency in vitamin B3, B6, folic acid, zinc and magnesium have all been linked to depression. Having a low homocysteine means your brain is good at ‘methylating’ which is the process by which the brain keeps it’s chemistry in balance. So it makes sense to both eat wholefoods, fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, high in these nutrients and supplementing a multivitamin.